Quote# 123426

Two letters published in the L.A. Times Travel section in print on Sunday, Dec. 11, and here online did not meet editorial standards. The Times’ Readers’ Representative says the letters weren’t ‘civil, fact-based discourse.’

Japanese internment

I see that writer Carolina A. Miranda has attached herself to the “I feel-good” contingent that feels sorry for the Japanese here in World War II [“ ‘Relevant’ Journey,” Nov. 27]. But this is just another anti-U.S. remake of history.

Remember, this was war for the life of our country. The Japanese had a clear way to land invading forces in California but lost their chance because they did not realize it.

Japanese have an extremely strong attachment to family, and even more so back then. First- generation and, to a lesser extent, Japanese here would have been expected to follow the wishes of their elders in Japan. Some, most or almost all might have refused, but the threat was there.

Had the Japanese been left on the streets of our city they would have been subject to hostility, injury and death at the hands of other citizens whose emotions ran high.

The U.S. government needed to concentrate on the war effort, not keep track of every reported espionage claim leveled against the Japanese. By the way, there were also internments for U.S. Germans though not as extensive as the Japanese.

Virtually everyone in the U.S. was assigned jobs to help the war effort. The Japanese were assigned the job of staying out of the way and not causing complications. Millions of Americans were assigned far worse jobs. Hundreds of thousands were wounded or died.

The interned Japanese were housed, fed, protected and cared for. Many who now complain would not even be alive if the internment had not been done.

I salute the Japanese for doing the part they were assigned during the war as I salute all those that sacrificed for the war effort. I have zero respect for those trying to rewrite history just to make themselves feel good.

Steve Hawes

Sunland

***

Maybe a little bit of balance in Miranda’s article would have been appropriate. You need to read "Killing the Rising Sun: How America Vanquished World War II Japan" by Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard to get the balance.

As the U.S. was putting families into the internment housing and feeding them, the Japanese were slaughtering Filipinos by the tens of thousands and U.S. soldiers after hideous torture.

War is evil, but I would have much rather been interned by the U.S. in California than by the Japanese in their captured lands.

One-way reporting is not very effective for the educated public. Please try a little balance next time. It's a lot more effective and honest.

Dick Venn

Steve Hawes, Dick Venn, LA Times 3 Comments [1/4/2017 6:51:30 AM]
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Indicible

The fact the regiment composed of those people that was sent to Europe to fight for the USA against Imperial Japan's allies (Germany and Italy) is one of the most highly regarded in the history of the US Army does not seem to have registered in their memories. I would say they are disrespecting veterans.
As far as we know the people that came from Germany in the preceding generations have not been interned. Why the difference in treatment?

1/4/2017 7:56:54 AM

nazani14

Writers and journalists are not obligated to throw a sop to every faction or alternate viewpoint that might possibly read their work. Indeed, Mr. Venn, you have neglected to mention what happened to all the property Japanese-Americans were forced to leave behind. Not balanced!

https://www.reddit.com/r/AskHistorians/comments/1batrq/what_happened_to_the_houses_and_belongings_us/

1/4/2017 9:25:34 AM

Uilleam

Two letters published in the L.A. Times Travel section in print on Sunday, Dec. 11, and here online did not meet editorial standards. The Times’ Readers’ Representative says the letters weren’t ‘civil, fact-based discourse.’


Just you wait, the alt-right will use this as the latest "evidence" of an evil conspiracy curtailing their free speech. For the last time, you morons, the right to free speech says the government isn't allowed to shut you up. Individual people and organisations have no such obligation, as the mods from r/The_Donald who ban anyone to the left of Hitler would gladly tell you.

the “I feel-good” contingent


Far-right loons think emotions other than anger are evil, part 5900784013477.

Had the Japanese been left on the streets of our city they would have been subject to hostility, injury and death at the hands of other citizens whose emotions ran high.


So it was alright to subject the Japanese to racial abuse... because otherwise they would have been subject to racial abuse. Double-U tee eff. Don't even get me started on the way he treats being locked up and losing all they owned as a privilege the Japanese should have thanked the US government for.

Maybe a little bit of balance in Miranda’s article would have been appropriate.


...and then proceeds to cite a book by Bill O'Reilly, master of ignoring left-wing opinions. Totally not a double standard.

On a tangentially related note, remember when O'Reilly was among the worst mainstream American conservatism had to offer? Man, I kinda miss those days...

War is evil, but I would have much rather been interned by the U.S. in California than by the Japanese in their captured lands.


I would personally prefer never to be interred by anyone, regardless of nation.

1/4/2017 9:46:41 AM
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