Quote# 123470

Controlling our thoughts by creating false narratives

Another technique used is subliminal messaging. This is a cornerstone of mind control, and when a person is unwittingly bombarded with cleverly concealed information, an emotion can be trigged leaving a person’s intellect and better judgment subjugated in favor of a mental process like fear or sexual desire. You may never consciously understand or realize why you begin to adopt certain behaviors, products of lifestyles, but the attraction is nonetheless real and that manifests itself through actual personal choices.

In a 2011 documentary called Programming the Nation, filmmaker, graphic artist and digital media producer Jeff Warrick, a former advertising sales rep, provided examples of how subliminal messaging and other subconscious methods are employed by ad executives and other media to create cultural ‘norms’ and social programs like consumerism, materialization of women’s bodies, health choices and the glorification of violence.

“Could such techniques really be contributing to a variety of social, political and economic problems currently present in our culture? Such as obesity, anorexia, and other eating disorders? The ongoing war on terror? And what about the ever-increasing amounts of debt, that has tightened its grip on a growing percentage of the population?” the documentary says.

Other techniques include fake news—yes, by the mainstream media—omission (not covering an issue as though it wasn’t real or important); slanting coverage through the use of biased “expert” sources; and publishing falsified data and science as though it were legitimate.

J. D. Heyes, Natural News 7 Comments [1/6/2017 6:57:56 AM]
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WTF?! || meh
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Uilleam

These guys are excellent at listing the signs of a fake news report, yet they can't detect the obvious proliferation of those signs in their own sources and instead insist it's the guys trying to tell the truth in a post-truth world who are liars. It's infuriating.

1/6/2017 10:13:03 AM

Azereaux

Wow, subliminal messages! Haven't seen
That in a while. Always nice to see someone dust off the classics.
For what are classics for, if not to be appreciated.
!

1/6/2017 12:09:26 PM

Gabriel LaVedier

“Could such techniques really be contributing to a variety of social, political and economic problems currently present in our culture? Such as obesity, anorexia, and other eating disorders? The ongoing war on terror? And what about the ever-increasing amounts of debt, that has tightened its grip on a growing percentage of the population?” the documentary says.

No. Not "says." The documentary "asks" these things. And the answer is no. Whenever a question is asked at the start of a sensationalist article, the answer at the end is No or Unknown. If the answer was Yes it would be the headline, not the question. That would be burying the lead, a big no-no even for conspiracy fuckheads.

1/6/2017 12:26:45 PM

nazani14

Subliminal messaging doesn't work unless you're already somewhat receptive to the ideas being slipped into the media. "Telefon" was a fun movie (and a great choice to watch on Jan 20th,) but this plot device has fallen out of favor. It's easy to detect with modern AV equipment, anyway.

1/6/2017 1:07:49 PM

Doubting Thomas

Yesterday I saw a subliminal advertising executive just for a second.

1/7/2017 8:11:41 AM

Kanna

To avoid this kind of mind-manipulation, you have to choose your sources carefully. Start with a lot of sources. Magazines, major newspapers, NBC, ABC, CNN, MSNBC as well as FOX, Huffington Post as well as Breitbart. Do you notice a pattern? When one person says something unbelievably scandalous or negative about a public figure, check to see how many others agree. If they all report in the same way, it's probably true, or as far as the current information allows. If they disagree (or if some "event" isn't even noticed by many others) mentally file it in the "questionable" pile. If you find a source with many, many questionable items, then the source itself is suspect. Cut it out from your news feed. Continue to prune until mind manipulation has been negated by our best presentation of facts.

1/7/2017 1:33:34 PM



Other techniques include fake news—yes, by the mainstream media—omission (not covering an issue as though it wasn’t real or important); slanting coverage through the use of biased “expert” sources; and publishing falsified data and science as though it were legitimate.
Aside from 'omission,' that's a perfect description of your post.

1/7/2017 6:21:46 PM
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