Quote# 13741

But also When I researched the origins of science itself I discoverd Its deep roots in pagan philosophy, alchemy, and so called "mystery" religions.
And it makes me ask, when did we ever redeem something that had pagan origins in it, by incorporating those ideas within ourselves? Science fiction I believe does that, fiction by its very nature is a lie, fantasy, and the love of it, is at its conclusion the love of a lie.

chris777, Christian Forums 39 Comments [8/10/2006 12:00:00 AM]
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MK

Begging to have a mirror smacked in his face.

8/10/2006 9:44:51 PM

whitewater55

Chris, you dumbfuck. Christianity absorbed every pagan myth it could find into its tenets. From Man-God to holidays, every element of christianity has its roots in paganism.
Mirror award seconded.

8/10/2006 9:50:40 PM

Dante's Virgil

If he fails to comprehend fiction, the use of metaphor would surely be beyond him as well.

8/10/2006 10:11:36 PM

joey444

Mirror award.

8/10/2006 10:13:07 PM

Scott

Mirror Award

8/10/2006 10:19:29 PM

Kyle

Aside from the irony of Christianity co-opting pagan myths and celebrations, there's also the irony that so many fundamentalists try to claim that science is somehow rooted in Christianity.

8/10/2006 10:20:00 PM

David D.G.

This is just stupefying. Mirror Award nomination thirded or whatever.


~David D.G.

8/10/2006 10:23:22 PM

Incubusion

Mirror award/10

8/10/2006 10:25:59 PM

Kat

And it makes me ask, when did we ever redeem something that had pagan origins in it, by incorporating those ideas within ourselves?

Oh, I don't know...maybe just the holidays of Christmas and Easter and the practice of communion and the traditional wedding ceremony, for starters.

8/10/2006 10:32:50 PM

Papabear

\"But also When I researched the origins of science itself I discoverd Its deep roots in pagan philosophy, alchemy, and so called \"mystery\" religions.\"

You did no such reasearch. Pagan \"philosophy,\" alchemy and mystery religions may have all been attempts to explain things that unenlightened societies found mysterious, but they were (are) not the roots of science anymore than Xianity is.


\"And it makes me ask, when did we ever redeem something that had pagan origins in it, by incorporating those ideas within ourselves?\"

You do it all the time, moron. For example, Easter is named after a pagan god. How 'bout Xmas trees, wreaths, Yule logs, holly, mistletoe, the Genesis creation stories, the Flood story, the story of Job. Need I go on?


\"Science fiction I believe does that, fiction by its very nature is a lie,\"

No, fiction is only a lie if it is propounded as the truth, like say, the Bible. Much of the Bible is fiction, but since it is purveyed as the truth, that fiction has become a lie.


\"fantasy, and the love of it, is at its conclusion the love of a lie.\"

No, as long as one realizes it's a fantasy, love of a fantasy is love of a fantasy. Xianity is love of a lie.

8/10/2006 10:33:31 PM

JohnRaptor

\"And it makes me ask, when did we ever redeem something that had pagan origins in it\"

Democracy.

8/10/2006 10:56:15 PM

Hadanelith

Mirror award n'thed.

8/10/2006 10:57:04 PM

Berny

Fundamentalist Christians fail to understand the concept of fiction, otherwise they would recognize it's liberal use in their Holy Book.

8/10/2006 11:53:17 PM

Napoleon the Clown

Whitewater beat me to mentioning that Christianity did that...

Pot and Kettle.

8/11/2006 12:13:30 AM

Crosis

<<< when did we ever redeem something that had pagan origins in it, by incorporating those ideas within ourselves? >>>

And we have our first nominee of the month for \"Rhetorical Question You Don't Want Answered\".

<<< fiction by its very nature is a lie >>>

No, because it doesn't pretend to be true (except for certain holy books I won't mention).

8/11/2006 12:33:53 AM

Julian

Yes and science fiction admits to being ummmm, fictitious. Please apply the same level of observation to your wholly babble.

8/11/2006 12:43:55 AM

Star Cluster

Not to mention the days of the week. One named for the Sun, one for the Moon, the rest named after pagan dieties. Not a one remotely named after something tied to Christianity.

8/11/2006 3:53:32 AM

glyptodon

Baaaaaahahaha.

8/11/2006 4:57:53 AM

Jodie

Another vote for Mirror Award here!

8/11/2006 6:14:28 AM

Prager

Mirror mirror...

8/11/2006 6:50:23 AM

Wolf O'Donnell (SWHQ)

Is he seriously stating that Christianity has not been influenced by other religions? His belief in the Trinity is proof enough.

8/11/2006 10:00:05 AM

NotMe

Papabear, I'd like to disagree with you. Chemistry has it's roots in alchemy.

8/11/2006 12:04:53 PM

Papabear

Not Me -- Yes that is true, but then it has roots in cooking and farming too.

8/11/2006 3:59:22 PM

Timwilkins1@bigpond.com

Don't anyone EVER explain to this guys about Christmas trees, or why major Christian feasts tend to be at the same time of year as Beltaine, Samhaine,<i>et al</i>... you'll break his heart

8/11/2006 4:28:50 PM

David D.G.

\"Science fiction I believe does that, fiction by its very nature is a lie, fantasy, and the love of it, is at its conclusion the love of a lie.\"

My mom is a bit of a fundie, and this statement reminded me of her just a bit -- not that her opinion is quite so extreme, just that she does not like to read fiction (especially the really weird stuff I like to read, namely science fiction) because it is, in her words, \"so unrealistic.\"

I can't think of a single piece of fiction (well, anything actually marketed as fiction) that she has read for herself in 40 years -- with one exception: the Left Behind series. My mom, who is not much of a reader and who regards virtually all fiction as \"too unrealistic\" for her to deal with, has devoured something like 11 books in this series.

Maybe there's a chance she'll learn to like science fiction yet -- or at least broaden her tastes to other kinds of fantasy.


~David D.G.

8/11/2006 5:41:12 PM

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