Faceception #psychoceramics #mammon faception.com

THEORY BEHIND THE TECHNOLOGY

The face can be used to predict a person’s personality and behavior.

This claim relies on a combination of two known research observations

1. According to Social and Life Science research personalities are affected by genes.

In fact genes play a greater role in determining key personality traits like social skills and learning ability than the way we are brought up by our parents, researchers claimed.

Researchers from Edinburgh University studied more than 800 sets of identical and non-identical twins to learn whether genetics or upbringing has a greater effect on how successful people are in life. Writing in the Journal of Personality, the researchers found that identical twins were twice as likely as non-identical twins to share the same personality traits, suggesting that their DNA was having the greatest impact.

2. Our face is a reflection of our DNA

Researchers have identified five of the genes that shape a person's face. Researchers previously knew that genetics played a large role in determining face shape, since identical twins share DNA. However, little was known about exactly which genes are involved. Three genes were thought to have roles in the arrangement of facial features, and the new research confirmed their involvement.

Working on mice, researchers have identified thousands of small regions of DNA that influence the way facial features develop. The researchers said that although the work was carried out on animals, the human face was likely to develop in the same way

In fact, It’s already possible to make some inferences about the appearance of crime suspects from their DNA alone.

And indeed, researchers were able to demonstrate that “Internal facial features are signals of personality and health.
While these type of affirmations are quite recent, in Chinese history, there have been people that have studied the “mapping of the face” for thousands of years.

Also, the epigenetics phenomena has recently demonstrated, in academia researches and March 31th 2017 Science magazine.

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Confused?

So were we! You can find all of this, and more, on Fundies Say the Darndest Things!

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