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Amos Yee #pedo channelnewsasia.com

SINGAPORE: Singaporean Amos Yee, who was granted asylum in the United States three years ago, has been charged with solicitation and possession of child porn in the US, according to the Chicago Sun-Times newspaper.

Yee - who was jailed in Singapore in 2015 and 2016 for hate speech against both Christians and Muslims - allegedly exchanged nude photographs and “thousands” of messages with a 14-year-old Texas girl while living in Chicago, the newspaper wrote on Friday (Oct 16).

If convicted, Yee’s asylum status could be revoked.

Yee, 20, appeared at the Leighton Criminal Courthouse for a bond hearing on Friday, the newspaper said.

The Chicago Sun-Times cited Cook County prosecutors as saying that the messages Yee exchanged with the girl between April and July last year included nude photos he had requested from her. He had also sent nude photos of himself to the girl, said the newspaper.

The prosecutors were cited as saying that the girl had repeatedly told Yee how old she was in their messages. Yee had also allegedly instructed her to remove her age from her profile on WhatsApp, the messaging service they used to communicate, the prosecutors said.

The Women and Family Ministry of Malaysia #sexist channelnewsasia.com

KUALA LUMPUR: Married women in Malaysia were briefly issued a set of recommendations on how to manage their households and husbands during the movement control order, including speaking in "Doraemon's voice" and giggling coyly.

The Women and Family Ministry on Monday (Mar 30) posted several tips on social media on how to avoid domestic arguments between husband and wife.

The posts, made public on both Facebook and Instagram, were taken down a day later.

“If you see your husband carry out a task in a manner that clashes with your own method, avoid nagging,” the ministry said in a since-deleted infographic.

READ: ‘We can do this’, say Malaysian social media users after extension of movement control order
In a separate image, the ministry said wives should instead use “humorous” words and phrases such as “this is the proper way to hang the clothes for drying, my dear (cara sidai baju macam ni lah sayangku)”.

The ministry also recommended that women should “mimic the tone of Doraemon” and follow their statements with a coy and feminine laugh.

In a third graphic, the ministry said that wives should refrain from making sarcastic comments if they see their husbands not helping with housework.

“Ask for help and inform him – in some cases, our partner needs to be ‘told’ of their responsibility in order for them to be aware of what needs to be done,” the post read.

Should arguments arise and strain feelings, the ministry advised women to “count from one to 20” before responding.

"Within the span of 20 seconds, the brain will become more rational and calm when making decisions,” it said.

In a Facebook post last Friday, which was still available as of Tuesday evening, the ministry also urged wives to avoid wearing “home clothes” during the movement control order: “Present yourself as per usual, wear makeup and dress neatly.”

In the same post, the ministry also recommended that working mothers keep the dining table, kitchen and living room clean and neat to help maintain a clear mind when working from home.

Malaysian Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin on Mar 25 announced that the movement control order would be extended by two weeks until Apr 14 to contain the further spread of COVID-19.

He urged Malaysians to stay at home to break the chain of infection and said that this was the only way to contain the situation.

READ: Malaysia unveils RM250 billion economic stimulus package as COVID-19 cases surge
WOMEN ARE HUMAN BEINGS, NOT AN OBJECT: NGO

The women ministry's social media posts have drawn flak from All Women’s Action Society (AWAM), a non-governmental organisation.

In a series of tweet, AWAM called the ministry out for the the "sexist" tips.

"While dressing up to work is one way of maintaining discipline and a route while working from home, the focus on look, dress and makeup is absolutely unnecessary," it said.

It added in another tweet: "(Giggling like Doraemon) applies to five-year-olds, not mothers at home."

Women are human beings and not an object or a commodity, it said.

"Women have more than enough to do during the MCO without the added pressure of putting on makeup and looking good."

The Women and Family Ministry said in a statement issued on Tuesday night that it is "sorry if several of the shared tips were unsuitable or touched on the sensitivities of certain parties".

The ministry added that it has received feedback from several parties in response to their tips, and that it will be more careful in the future.

Kuala Terengganu Sharia High Court and Wan Abdul Malik Wan Sidek #fundie channelnewsasia.com

KUALA TERENGGANU, Terengganu: Two Malaysian women were caned Monday (Sep 3) for having lesbian sex in violation of strict Islamic laws, despite an outcry from activists at the "cruel and unjust" punishment.

The case has sparked widespread condemnation and focused attention on what rights groups say is a deteriorating climate for the gay community in the Muslim-majority country.

Campaigners said it was the first time that women in Malaysia have been caned for violating a sharia regulation which forbids same-sex relations.

The country operates a dual-track legal system. Islamic courts can handle religious and family matters for Muslim citizens, as well as cases such as adultery.

The women, aged 22 and 32, were arrested in April by Islamic enforcement officers after they were found in a car in a public square in the northern state of Terengganu, one of the country's most conservative areas.

The pair, whose identities have not been revealed, pleaded guilty last month to breaking Islamic laws and were sentenced to be whipped and fined 3,300 ringgit (US$800).

They were caned at the Sharia High Court in the state capital Kuala Terengganu.

A judge read out their sentence just before 10am (0300 GMT) and then officials meted out the punishment using thin canes in front of a packed courtroom, according to a journalist in the court.

[...]

Court official Wan Abdul Malik Wan Sidek defended the punishment, saying it was not as tough as caning carried out for numerous crimes under Malaysia's civil law.

Caning under Islamic law is carried out with a relatively thin cane on subjects who are fully clothed, and is more about humiliation than causing pain.