Gymcelled #sexist incels.co

HALO EFFECT - Victimized employees are seen as bullies despite exemplary performance, actual bullies get a pass

There's an article that covers this paper, i'll copy paste some important parts.

tl;dr Victims of workplace mistreatment may also be seen as bullies themselves, even if they've never engaged in such behavior. Bullies may be given a pass if they are liked by their supervisor.

"The results are eye-opening," Taylor says. "People are often left wondering how can we blame victims, and why do we let these perpetrators off the hook, why do they go unpunished?"

@Atavistic Autist You were right when you said psychopaths succeed in today's world.

Taylor attributes the flawed decision making to cognitive biases, such as the halo effect, or the horns effect.

The first two studies showed that supervisors tend to view victims of bullying as being bullies themselves.

Even when evaluators were clearly informed that a victim did not mistreat others, victims were still seen as bullies. Not only are victims seen as bullies despite evidence to the contrary, but also that they receive lower job performance evaluations as a result of being victimized.

Your behavior doesn't fucking matter. Jfl at people using the just world fallacy these days, like we live in a social meritocracy

The researchers found that bullies were less likely to be seen as deviant when their supervisor considered them to be good performers.

People get away with treating others like absolute shit. Reminds me of when a kid is bullied at school, he's beaten and mocked all day, grows up scarred and insecure. People will tell him that HIS social skills were bad and the social skills of his bullies were GOOD. Psychopaths who torture you are seen as socially apt, if not outright gifted. What does this say about society?

3 comments

Confused?

So were we! You can find all of this, and more, on Fundies Say the Darndest Things!

To post a comment, you'll need to Sign in or Register. Making an account also allows you to claim credit for submitting quotes, and to vote on quotes and comments. You don't even need to give us your email address.