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Alan Keyes #quack #fundie

Alan Keyes #quack #fundie thedailybeast.com

Alan Keyes Is Helping Sell a Toxic Bleach ‘Cure’ to the Vulnerable and Desperate

They promote bleach as a miracle cure and distribute it to children in developing countries. And now they have a prominent conservative pundit propping up their network.

The “Miracle Mineral Solution” (“MMS”) movement falsely claims a dangerous chlorine dioxide cocktail can cure almost any illness, from autism to infertility. A new addition to the Facebook-fueled movement is IAMtv, a conservative web-based channel fronted by Alan Keyes, former diplomat and adviser to President Ronald Reagan who appears in pro-MMS broadcasts with bottles of MMS from a dubious bleach “church” featured prominently on his desk. IAMtv figures even claim Keyes is helping the network spread its mission from Uganda to the halls of power in the U.S..

On a broadcast in August, IAMtv host Bob Sisson invoked Keyes’ name while discussing MMS.

“I get to use my ‘I work with Alan Keyes,’” Sisson said, miming a fishing rod as he pretended to reel someone in with Keyes’ name.

“Which is sorta cool because I met [Christian personality] Ken Ham a week ago; I met the governor of Kentucky, Matt Bevin, a super guy; met Governor Bill Lee here in Tennessee.

“Gonna meet Trump, it’s only a matter of time. President Trump’s gonna invite us up there, when he finds out about this stuff,” Sisson added.

He held up green and blue bottles stamped with the logo for the Genesis II Church of Health and Healing that apparently contained the chemicals that create the dangerous cocktail chlorine dioxide, or “MMS” when combined.

MMS has found a growing fanbase, often among people skeptical of modern medicine or desperate for miracle cures. Meanwhile, its champions are trying to make the concoction mainstream.

There is nothing miraculous about Miracle Mineral Solution. It’s poison. As the Food and Drug Administration warned in an August statement, the solution is “a powerful bleaching agent.”

“Miracle Mineral Solution has not been approved by the FDA for any use, but these products continue to be promoted on social media as a remedy for treating autism, cancer, HIV/AIDS, hepatitis and flu, among other conditions,” the FDA noted. “However, the solution, when mixed, develops into a dangerous bleach which has caused serious and potentially life-threatening side effects.”